1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (2024)

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    1.1 - Introduction to Whole Numbers

    Identify Counting Numbers and Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, determine which of the following numbers are (a) counting numbers (b) whole numbers.

    1. 0, 2, 99
    2. 0, 3, 25
    3. 0, 4, 90
    4. 0, 1, 75

    Model Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, model each number using base-10 blocks and then show its value using place value notation.

    1. 258
    2. 104

    Identify the Place Value of a Digit

    In the following exercises, find the place value of the given digits.

    1. 472,981

    (a) 8 (b) 4 (c) 1 (d) 7 (e) 2

    1. 12,403,295

    (a) 4 (b) 0 (c) 1 (d) 9 (e) 3

    Use Place Value to Name Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, name each number in words.

    1. 5,280
    2. 204,614
    3. 5,012,582
    4. 31,640,976

    Use Place Value to Write Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, write each number as a whole number using digits.

    1. six hundred two
    2. fifteen thousand, two hundred fifty-three
    3. three hundred forty million, nine hundred twelve thousand, sixty-one
    4. two billion, four hundred ninety-two million, seven hundred eleven thousand, two

    Round Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, round to the nearest ten.

    1. 412
    2. 648
    3. 3,556
    4. 2,734

    In the following exercises, round to the nearest hundred.

    1. 38,975
    2. 26,849
    3. 81,486
    4. 75,992

    1.2 - Add Whole Numbers

    Use Addition Notation

    In the following exercises, translate the following from math notation to words.

    1. 4 + 3
    2. 25 + 18
    3. 571 + 629
    4. 10,085 + 3,492

    Model Addition of Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, model the addition.

    1. 6 + 7
    2. 38 + 14

    Add Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, fill in the missing values in each chart.

    1. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (2)
    2. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (3)

    In the following exercises, add.

    1. (a) 0 + 19 (b) 19 + 0
    2. (a) 0 + 480 (b) 480 + 0
    3. (a) 7 + 6 (b) 6 + 7
    4. (a) 23 + 18 (b) 18 + 23
    5. 44 + 35
    6. 63 + 29
    7. 96 + 58
    8. 375 + 591
    9. 7,281 + 12,546
    10. 5,280 + 16,324 + 9,731

    Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

    In the following exercises, translate each phrase into math notation and then simplify.

    1. the sum of 30 and 12
    2. 11 increased by 8
    3. 25 more than 39
    4. total of 15 and 50

    Add Whole Numbers in Applications

    In the following exercises, solve.

    1. Shopping for an interview Nathan bought a new shirt, tie, and slacks to wear to a job interview. The shirt cost $24, the tie cost $14, and the slacks cost $38. What was Nathan’s total cost?
    2. Running Jackson ran 4 miles on Monday, 12 miles on Tuesday, 1 mile on Wednesday, 8 miles on Thursday, and 5 miles on Friday. What was the total number of miles Jackson ran?

    In the following exercises, find the perimeter of each figure.

    1. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (4)
    2. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (5)

    1.3 - Subtract Whole Numbers

    Use Subtraction Notation

    In the following exercises, translate the following from math notation to words.

    1. 14 − 5
    2. 40 − 15
    3. 351 − 249
    4. 5,724 − 2,918

    Model Subtraction of Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, model the subtraction.

    1. 18 − 4
    2. 41 − 29

    Subtract Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, subtract and then check by adding.

    1. 8 − 5
    2. 12 − 7
    3. 23 − 9
    4. . 46 − 21
    5. 82 − 59
    6. 110 − 87
    7. 539 − 217
    8. 415 − 296
    9. 1,020 − 640
    10. 8,355 − 3,947
    11. 10,000 − 15
    12. 54,925 − 35,647

    Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

    In the following exercises, translate and simplify.

    1. the difference of nineteen and thirteen
    2. subtract sixty-five from one hundred
    3. seventy-four decreased by eight
    4. twenty-three less than forty-one

    Subtract Whole Numbers in Applications

    In the following exercises, solve.

    1. Temperature The high temperature in Peoria one day was 86 degrees Fahrenheit and the low temperature was 28 degrees Fahrenheit. What was the difference between the high and low temperatures?
    2. Savings Lynn wants to go on a cruise that costs $2,485. She has $948 in her vacation savings account. How much more does she need to save in order to pay for the cruise?

    1.4 - Multiply Whole Numbers

    Use Multiplication Notation

    In the following exercises, translate from math notation to words.

    1. 8 × 5
    2. 6 • 14
    3. (10)(95)
    4. 54(72)

    Model Multiplication of Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, model the multiplication.

    1. 2 × 4
    2. 3 × 8

    Multiply Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, fill in the missing values in each chart.

    1. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (6)
    2. 1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (7)

    In the following exercises, multiply.

    1. 0 • 14
    2. (256)0
    3. 1 • 99
    4. (4,789)1
    5. (a) 7 • 4 (b) 4 • 7
    6. (25)(6)
    7. 9,261 × 3
    8. 48 • 76
    9. 64 • 10
    10. 1,000(22)
    11. 162 × 493
    12. (601)(943)
    13. 3,624 × 517
    14. 10,538 • 22

    Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

    In the following exercises, translate and simplify.

    1. the product of 15 and 28
    2. ninety-four times thirty-three
    3. twice 575
    4. ten times two hundred sixty-four

    Multiply Whole Numbers in Applications

    In the following exercises, solve.

    1. Gardening Geniece bought 8 packs of marigolds to plant in her yard. Each pack has 6 flowers. How many marigolds did Geniece buy?
    2. Cooking Ratika is making rice for a dinner party. The number of cups of water is twice the number of cups of rice. If Ratika plans to use 4 cups of rice, how many cups of water does she need?
    3. Multiplex There are twelve theaters at the multiplex and each theater has 150 seats. What is the total number of seats at the multiplex?
    4. Roofing Lewis needs to put new shingles on his roof. The roof is a rectangle, 30 feet by 24 feet. What is the area of the roof?

    1.5 - Divide Whole Numbers

    Use Division Notation

    Translate from math notation to words.

    1. 54 ÷ 9
    2. 42 / 7
    3. \(\dfrac{72}{8}\)
    4. \(6 \overline{\smash{)}48}\)

    Model Division of Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, model.

    1. 8 ÷ 2
    2. \(3 \overline{\smash{)}12}\)

    Divide Whole Numbers

    In the following exercises, divide. Then check by multiplying.

    1. 14 ÷ 2
    2. \(\dfrac{32}{8}\)
    3. 52 ÷ 4
    4. \(26 \overline{\smash{)}26}\)
    5. \(\dfrac{97}{1}\)
    6. 0 ÷ 52
    7. 100 ÷ 0
    8. \(\dfrac{355}{5}\)
    9. 3828 ÷ 6
    10. \(31 \overline{\smash{)}1,519}\)
    11. \(\dfrac{7505}{25}\)
    12. 5,166 ÷ 42

    Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

    In the following exercises, translate and simplify.

    1. the quotient of 64 and 16
    2. the quotient of 572 and 52

    Divide Whole Numbers in Applications

    In the following exercises, solve.

    1. Ribbon One spool of ribbon is 27 feet. Lizbeth uses 3 feet of ribbon for each gift basket that she wraps. How many gift baskets can Lizbeth wrap from one spool of ribbon?
    2. Juice One carton of fruit juice is 128 ounces. How many 4 ounce cups can Shayla fill from one carton of juice?

    PRACTICE TEST

    1. Determine which of the following numbers are (a) counting numbers (b) whole numbers. $$0, 4, 87$$
    2. Find the place value of the given digits in the number 549,362.

    (a) 9 (b) 6 (c) 2 (d) 5

    1. Write each number as a whole number using digits.

    (a) six hundred thirteen (b) fifty-five thousand two hundred eight

    1. Round 25,849 to the nearest hundred.

    Simplify.

    1. 45 + 23
    2. 65 − 42
    3. 85 ÷ 5
    4. 1,000 × 8
    5. 90 − 58
    6. 73 + 89
    7. (0)(12,675)
    8. 634 + 255
    9. \(\dfrac{0}{9}\)
    10. \(8 \overline{\smash{)}128}\)
    11. 145 − 79
    12. 299 + 836
    13. 7 • 475
    14. 8,528 + 704
    15. 35(14)
    16. \(\dfrac{26}{0}\)
    17. 733 − 291
    18. 4,916 − 1,538
    19. 495 ÷ 45
    20. 52 × 983

    Translate each phrase to math notation and then simplify.

    1. The sum of 16 and 58
    2. The product of 9 and 15
    3. The difference of 32 and 18
    4. The quotient of 63 and 21
    5. Twice 524
    6. 29 more than 32
    7. 50 less than 300

    In the following exercises, solve.

    1. LaVelle buys a jumbo bag of 84 candies to make favor bags for her son’s party. If she wants to make 12 bags, how many candies should she put in each bag?
    2. Last month, Stan’s take-home pay was $3,816 and his expenses were $3,472. How much of his take-home pay did Stan have left after he paid his expenses?
    3. Each class at Greenville School has 22 children enrolled. The school has 24 classes. How many children are enrolled at Greenville School?
    4. Clayton walked 12 blocks to his mother’s house, 6 blocks to the gym, and 9 blocks to the grocery store before walking the last 3 blocks home. What was the total number of blocks that Clayton walked?

    Contributors and Attributions

    1.E: Whole Numbers (Exercises) (2024)

    FAQs

    What is the whole number question answer? ›

    The whole numbers are the numbers without fractions and it is a collection of positive integers and zero. It is represented by the symbol “W” and the set of numbers are {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,……………}. Zero as a whole represents nothing or a null value. Whole Numbers: W = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10……}

    What is the whole number in mathematics pdf? ›

    Whole numbers are a collection of numbers that includes zero as well as all of the positive numbers we count with, such as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and so on. Negative numbers and numbers expressed as fractions or decimals are not included in this collection.

    Are all natural numbers whole numbers? ›

    Yes, all the natural numbers are whole numbers since natural numbers begin from 1,2,3,4 and so on and whole numbers begin from 0, 1,2,3,4, and so on. But not all whole numbers are natural numbers.

    What is the property of the whole numbers? ›

    According to the commutative property of whole numbers, if two whole numbers are added or multiplied together, then the change in order of the numbers does not change the result. We can add or multiply two whole numbers in any order. If A and B are two whole numbers, then; A + B = B + A.

    What is 1 in whole number? ›

    The whole numbers are set of real numbers that includes zero and all positive counting numbers. Whereas, excludes fractions, negative integers, fractions, and decimals. Since, 1 is a positive integer and is a counting number. Hence, it is considered to be a whole number.

    What are the first 4 whole numbers? ›

    Whole numbers include natural numbers that begin from 1 onwards. Let us look at some examples of whole numbers. The set of whole numbers is denoted by the alphabet 'W'. W = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,.…}

    Which is the smallest whole number? ›

    0 is the smallest whole number.

    Why is zero a whole number? ›

    The whole numbers are real numbers that do not have fractions, decimals, and negative numbers. Zero is not a fraction or decimal of any number. It is neither positive nor negative. Zero obeys the rule of whole numbers.

    What is the greatest whole number? ›

    So, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4…… are the whole numbers. We can clearly say that 1 is the smallest natural number and 0 is the smallest whole number. But there is no largest whole number because each number has its successor. Thus, there is no largest whole number.

    What is whole number give example? ›

    The definition of a whole number is simply any positive number that does not include a fractional or decimal part. This means that, for example, the numbers 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 are all whole numbers. Numbers such as -3, 2.7, or 3 ½ are not whole numbers. Whole numbers are also known as Integers.

    What are the three 3 properties of numbers? ›

    There are four basic properties of numbers: commutative, associative, distributive, and identity. You should be familiar with each of these. It is especially important to understand these properties once you reach advanced math such as algebra and calculus.

    What is a whole number in math? ›

    Whole numbers are positive numbers, including zero, without any decimal or fractional parts. They are numbers that represent whole things without pieces. The set of whole numbers is represented mathematically by the set: {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5...}.

    What is number system question answer? ›

    A number system is defined as a system of writing to express numbers. It is the mathematical notation for representing numbers of a given set by using digits or other symbols in a consistent manner. It provides a unique representation of every number and represents the arithmetic and algebraic structure of the figures.

    Why is 24 a whole number? ›

    First digit after the decimal point is 0, therefore 24 is an Integer and since 24 is also a positive integer, therefore, 24 is a whole number.

    What are the whole numbers 1 to 100? ›

    The first 100 whole numbers are 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25,26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, ...

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